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Replacing Your Chimney Liner

Picture your chimney system as a knight, guarding your home and family against dangerous enemies: flames, exceptionally high heat, dangerous (even potentially deadly) gases. Your fireplace or stove is a wonderful addition to your home, and a great place to crowd around and enjoy some togetherness. But we can’t forget that fire and its byproducts are dangerous, and that your chimney is working hard to keep you safe.

If your chimney is a knight, its flue liner is its armor, buffering it against those attackers, keeping it strong. So using a chimney with a damaged or degraded flue liner is a lot like sending a knight into battle without protective armor. It’s not equipped to do its job properly, and chances are, it won’t survive very long.

Your flue liner helps the chimney contain and vent toxic carbon monoxide, and buffers the masonry against the heat of your fire, minimizing the possibility of damage to framing and other building materials in close proximity. So it’s important for that liner to be intact and strong. If your liner is failing, it should be repaired or replaced, and Mr. Smokestack’s technicians can help.

Situations That Might Make Replacing Your Chimney Liner Necessary

Damaged clay tile liners

Most chimneys are built with a liner that’s made out of terra cotta clay tiles, and these are most often replaced. Those tiles can crack, fall off or begin spalling, and the masonry joints between them can crack, erode and degrade. In some cases, that damage can be repaired, but if it’s considerable, replacing the liner may be the safest option.

Need to resize a flue

If you install a new appliance to vent through your existing chimney, there’s a chance that the flue won’t be sized correctly. Appliances are designed to work with a specifically sized flue, and proper draft won’t occur if the flue is too big or too small. (Moisture damage or downdrafts can occur with improperly sized flues, too.) The most effective way to resize a flue, in that case, is to have a new stainless steel liner installed.

There wasn’t a liner there to begin with

In some historic homes, chimneys were built without a liner at all — and that’s a highly inefficient, highly dangerous situation. If your chimney doesn’t have a liner, Mr. Smokestack can — and should — install one. If your chimney liner is damaged and in need of repair or replacement, we can help — just give Mr. Smokestack a call!