Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.

The time is getting closer for chestnuts to be roasting on an open fire, and that means fireplace users need to be getting ready to keep their families both safe and warm for the season.  The first step to doing so is having your yearly chimney sweep and maintenance administered.  Thankfully, Mr. Smokestack is ready to help you with all of your fireplace needs.

When most people think about what they will find in their chimney when they or the inspectors go to clean it, they think leaves and twigs, creosotes, and unfortunately sometimes mold.  But what to your wandering eyes should appear?  Not Santa’s reindeer, but a different kind of animal inside of your chimney.  First, you should know that the animal is not getting in your chimney to harm you.  Majority of the time they have either fallen inside of the unit and cannot get out, or they have mistaken an uncapped chimney as a hollow tree and plan to make a home on the inside.  Common animals that make their ways into chimneys are birds, raccoons, and squirrels.

So the first step to preventing animals from getting into your chimney is to make sure you have the appropriate sized cap on the top.  This will block the chimney from animals and anything else that may draw an animal in.  Also, having your sweep and maintenance is important because a sweep will remove whatever the animal has brought in and if there is a problem with the structure allowing them in, they technicians will be able to fix it.

If you suspect you have an animal in your chimney you should get the unit inspected as soon as possible.  It is important that you do not try to handle the matter yourself as you do not know what kind of animal may be involved and what diseases they may carry.  Also, animal droppings have been known to start fires if they are under the right conditions.  There could also be a foul odor coming out of your chimney if the animal becomes deceased.  Lastly, some animals will have their young inside of a chimney, so letting the problem continue could potentially endanger baby animals.